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Apr 9
Apr 9

Best Study Locations and Time to Study

psych-facts:

1. Study in different places.

Studies show that studying in different places helps us remember better because our brain becomes more active in trying to make connections. In one classic study, participants were asked to study a list of 40 vocabularies in two different rooms -…

Apr 8
amandapalmer:

fact-tory:

lookatthisfuckingoppressor:

smellyanne:

lookatthisfuckinradfem:

Well, you know…shit.

why would you pay someone for 26-51 weeks for doing nothing

you have a very, very odd definition of “doing nothing”.

Why would you pay someone for 26-51 weeks to care for a child (which is, as the previous comment states, in no way “doing nothing”)?
Allow me to answer that for you:
A study of 16 European countries from 1969-1994 found that “more generous paid leave is found to reduce deaths of infants and young children”; specifically, mathematical models found that
"a 10-week increase in paid leave is predicted to reduce infant mortality rates by between 2.5% and 3.4%,"
"a 10-week extension [in leave] is predicted to decrease post-neonatal deaths by 3.7 to 4.5% and child fatalities by 3.3 to 3.5%," and
"rights to a year of job-protected paid leave are associated with roughly a 20% decline in post-neonatal deaths and a 15% decrease in fatalities occurring between the first and fifth birthdays" (x)

A more recent study again of 16 European countries plus the USA and Japan found that “a 10-week extension in job-protected paid leave is predicted to decrease infant mortality rates, post-neonatal mortality rates, and child mortality rates by 2.6%, 4.1%, and 3%, respectively” but that these effects were not found if the leave was not job-protected or paid (x)
Women who receive pad leave are more likely to be employed, 54% more likely to report wage increases, and have a 39% lower likelihood of receiving public assistance and a 40% lower likelihood of receiving food stamps in the year after the child’s birth; men were also less likely to receive public assistance and food stamps if they received paid family leave (x)
"Maternity leave legislation in Europe effectively increases job protection and female labour market attachment" (x)
"An increase in leave duration is associated with a decrease in [post-partum] depressive symptoms until six months postpartum" (x)
"Shorter maternity leave (<12 weeks) was associated with higher maternal depression, lower parental preoccupation with the infant, less knowledge of infant development, more negative impact of birth on self-esteem and marriage, and higher career centrality" (x)
"Breastfeeding duration increased sharply, by over a month, and the proportion of mothers attaining the public health benchmark of 6 months exclusive breastfeeding increased by nearly 40% [after Canada increased the length of mandated paid maternity leave]" (x)
"Maternity leave led to small increases in birth weight, decreases in the likelihood of a premature birth, and substantial decreases in infant mortality for children of college-educated and married mothers, who were most able to take advantage of unpaid leave [in the US]" (x)
"Increased time with the child [due to mandated maternity leave in Norway] led to a 2.7 percentage points decline in high school dropout and a 5% increase in wages at age 30" (x)
"Children whose mothers return to work early are less likely to receive regular medical checkups and breastfeeding in the first year of life, as well as to have all of their DPT/Oral Polio immunisations (in approximately the first 18 months of life)" and "children whose mothers return full-time within 12 weeks are more likely to have externalising behaviour problems at age 4" (x)
Does that about answer it?

i saw these statistics in one of the TED talks a few weeks ago.
depressing as fuck.
go USA.

amandapalmer:

fact-tory:

lookatthisfuckingoppressor:

smellyanne:

lookatthisfuckinradfem:

Well, you know…shit.

why would you pay someone for 26-51 weeks for doing nothing

you have a very, very odd definition of “doing nothing”.

Why would you pay someone for 26-51 weeks to care for a child (which is, as the previous comment states, in no way “doing nothing”)?

Allow me to answer that for you:

  • A study of 16 European countries from 1969-1994 found that “more generous paid leave is found to reduce deaths of infants and young children”; specifically, mathematical models found that
    • "a 10-week increase in paid leave is predicted to reduce infant mortality rates by between 2.5% and 3.4%,"
    • "a 10-week extension [in leave] is predicted to decrease post-neonatal deaths by 3.7 to 4.5% and child fatalities by 3.3 to 3.5%," and
    • "rights to a year of job-protected paid leave are associated with roughly a 20% decline in post-neonatal deaths and a 15% decrease in fatalities occurring between the first and fifth birthdays" (x)
  • A more recent study again of 16 European countries plus the USA and Japan found that “a 10-week extension in job-protected paid leave is predicted to decrease infant mortality rates, post-neonatal mortality rates, and child mortality rates by 2.6%, 4.1%, and 3%, respectively” but that these effects were not found if the leave was not job-protected or paid (x)
  • Women who receive pad leave are more likely to be employed, 54% more likely to report wage increases, and have a 39% lower likelihood of receiving public assistance and a 40% lower likelihood of receiving food stamps in the year after the child’s birth; men were also less likely to receive public assistance and food stamps if they received paid family leave (x)
  • "Maternity leave legislation in Europe effectively increases job protection and female labour market attachment" (x)
  • "An increase in leave duration is associated with a decrease in [post-partum] depressive symptoms until six months postpartum" (x)
  • "Shorter maternity leave (<12 weeks) was associated with higher maternal depression, lower parental preoccupation with the infant, less knowledge of infant development, more negative impact of birth on self-esteem and marriage, and higher career centrality" (x)
  • "Breastfeeding duration increased sharply, by over a month, and the proportion of mothers attaining the public health benchmark of 6 months exclusive breastfeeding increased by nearly 40% [after Canada increased the length of mandated paid maternity leave]" (x)
  • "Maternity leave led to small increases in birth weight, decreases in the likelihood of a premature birth, and substantial decreases in infant mortality for children of college-educated and married mothers, who were most able to take advantage of unpaid leave [in the US]" (x)
  • "Increased time with the child [due to mandated maternity leave in Norway] led to a 2.7 percentage points decline in high school dropout and a 5% increase in wages at age 30" (x)
  • "Children whose mothers return to work early are less likely to receive regular medical checkups and breastfeeding in the first year of life, as well as to have all of their DPT/Oral Polio immunisations (in approximately the first 18 months of life)" and "children whose mothers return full-time within 12 weeks are more likely to have externalising behaviour problems at age 4" (x)

Does that about answer it?

i saw these statistics in one of the TED talks a few weeks ago.

depressing as fuck.

go USA.

Apr 7

(Source: rebloglr)

Apr 7
spaceplasma:

Suppose you had a single hydrogen atom and at a particular instant plotted the position of its electron. Soon afterwards, you do the same thing, and find that it is in a new position. You have no idea how it got from the first place to the second. You keep on doing this over and over again, and gradually build up a sort of 3D map of the places that the electron is likely to be found.
The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle  says - loosely - that you can’t know with certainty both where an electron is and where it’s going next. That makes it impossible to plot an orbit for an electron around a nucleus, but we have a mathematical function that describes the wave-like behavior of either one electron or a pair of electrons in an atom. This function can be used to calculate the probability of finding any electron of an atom in any specific region around the atom’s nucleus.
In the hydrogen case, the electron can be found anywhere within a spherical space surrounding the nucleus. Such a region of space is called an orbital. Orbits and orbitals sound similar, but they have quite different meanings. It is essential that you understand the difference between them. You can think of an orbital as being the region of space in which the electron lives. The GIF animation shows the probability densities for the electron of a hydrogen atom in different quantum states. These orbitals form an orthonormal basis for the wave function of the electron. These shapes are intended to describe the angular forms of regions in space where the electrons occupying the orbital are likely to be found.

spaceplasma:

Suppose you had a single hydrogen atom and at a particular instant plotted the position of its electron. Soon afterwards, you do the same thing, and find that it is in a new position. You have no idea how it got from the first place to the second. You keep on doing this over and over again, and gradually build up a sort of 3D map of the places that the electron is likely to be found.

The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle  says - loosely - that you can’t know with certainty both where an electron is and where it’s going next. That makes it impossible to plot an orbit for an electron around a nucleus, but we have a mathematical function that describes the wave-like behavior of either one electron or a pair of electrons in an atom. This function can be used to calculate the probability of finding any electron of an atom in any specific region around the atom’s nucleus.

In the hydrogen case, the electron can be found anywhere within a spherical space surrounding the nucleus. Such a region of space is called an orbital. Orbits and orbitals sound similar, but they have quite different meanings. It is essential that you understand the difference between them. You can think of an orbital as being the region of space in which the electron lives. The GIF animation shows the probability densities for the electron of a hydrogen atom in different quantum states. These orbitals form an orthonormal basis for the wave function of the electron. These shapes are intended to describe the angular forms of regions in space where the electrons occupying the orbital are likely to be found.

(Source: goo.gl)

Apr 7
Apr 7

(Source: boudye)

Apr 7

(Source: boudye)

Apr 7

(Source: durois)

Apr 7
I shot you if I do not like you

I shot you if I do not like you

(Source: boudye)

Apr 7

(Source: boudye)

Apr 7
strictsoup:

shorts

strictsoup:

shorts

Apr 7
Do you remember that movie? :)

Do you remember that movie? :)

(Source: boudye)

Apr 7
umq:

San Francisco :: (Nathan Whelan)

umq:

San Francisco :: (Nathan Whelan)

Apr 7
fotografiae:

Recovery by PeterVooijs-Photography. http://ift.tt/1fXhgPk

fotografiae:

Recovery by PeterVooijs-Photography. http://ift.tt/1fXhgPk